New CDs added in March!

New CDs for March 2017

Classical

Frederic Chopin – Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2
Jessie Montgomery – Strum: Music for Strings

Jessie Montgomery - Strum

Carl Nielsen – Symphony No. 1 op. 7/ Little Suite, Op. 1
Louis Spohr – Violin Concertos 7, 9 & 10

Louis Spohr - Violin Concertos

Ingolf Turban – Violin Concertos by Bruch, Busoni and Strauss

Jazz

Stefon Harris – Ninety Miles
SF Jazz Collective – Wonder: The Songs of Stevie Wonder

SF Jazz Collective - Wonder

Bluegrass

Nefesh Mountain – Nefesh Mountain

Nefesh Mountain

Ballet, Musical Theatre and Motion Picture Music

Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle – Sissle and Blake sing Shuffle Along
Geoffrey Simon – French Ballet Music of the 1920s
Frank Zappa – 200 Motels: The Suites

French Ballet Music of the 1920s

Vocal Music

Christian Gerhaher – Mahler: Orchestral Songs
Christian Gerhaher – Mozart: Arias

Sissle & Blake sing Shuffle Along

New CDs added in October!

New CDs for October 2016

Ballet Music

Atlantic Sinfonietta- Music For Martha Graham
Atlantic Sinfonietta- More Music For Martha Graham
Atlantic Sinfonietta – Music For Martha Graham III

Music for Martha Graham

Jazz

Joey Alexander – Countdown
Seamus Blake – Bellwether
John Daversa- Kaleidoscope Eyes: The Music of the Beatles

John Daversa - Kaleidoscope Eyes

Sara Gazarek and Josh Nelson – Dream in the Blue
The Fred Hersch Trio – Sunday Night at the Vanguard
Marquis Hill – The Way We Play

Gazarek/Nelson - Dream in the Blue

Charlie Hunter – Everybody Has A Plan Until They Get Punched In The Mouth
Charlie Hunter Trio – Let The Bells Ring On
Steve Lehman – Se´le´be´yone

Charlie Hunter - Let The Bells Ring On

Steve Lehman Octet – Mise en abime
Lage Lund – Idlewild
Jeff Parker – The New Breed

Jeff Parker - The New Breed

Joshua Redman and Brad Mehldau – Nearness
Catherine Russell – Harlem On My Mind
Dayna Stephens featuring Walter Smith III – Reminiscent

Catherine Russell - Harlem On My Mind

Scott Tixier – Cosmic Adventure
Steve Turre – Colors for the Masters
Ben Wendel – What We Bring

Scott Tixier - Cosmic Adventure

Opera

Antonio Carlos Gomes – Il Guarany

Gomes - Il Guarany

Classical

Leopold Stokowski – The Columbia Stereo Recordings

Stokowski  - The Columbia Stereo Recordings

Pop/Rock/R&B

Babes in Toyland – Spanking Machine
Bikini Kill – The First Two Records
Huggy Bear – Weaponry Listens To Love

Bikini Kill - The First Two Records

Kate Nash – Girl Talk
Sleater-Kinney – Sleater-Kinney
Sleater-Kinney – Dig Me Out

Kate Nash - Girl Talk

This ain’t your grandma’s ballet.

Editor’s Note: The following contribution is a guest post by UR undergraduate James Fong, who is a Student Assistant working at Parsons Music Library. Thanks, James, for the insights on the in-famous work of Igor Stravinksy!

Ever see a ballet that made you want to riot? If that sounds strange, that’s because it is. The brainchild of composer Igor Stravinsky and impresario Sergei Diaghilev, The Rite of Spring caused its audience members to do just that.

Prior to May 29, 1913, ballet was a rather docile thing. From its first beginnings in Renaissance Italy as a courtly activity for the aristocracy, to its transformation as a formalized discipline involving grace and technique by the late 19th century, ballet was fairly content with itself.
There would be an added creative wrinkle here or there (poses, costumes, etc.), but its fashionability in the day gave it no reason to revolutionize itself.
Then May 29, 1913 happened.

“The theater resembled a prison yard: shouting, howling whistling, slapping, punching.”

“A beautifully dressed lady in an orchestra box stood up and slapped the face of a young man who was hissing in the next box. Her escort arose, and cards were exchanged between the men. A duel followed next day.”

480 px width, cropped version of original by Flickr poster "Piano Piano!"

Sacre du Printemps – London Philharmonic Orchestra

“Exactly what I wanted.” – Diaghilev

That is only a microcosm of the reception of a ballet centered around the creative forces of Spring. That and a sacrificial virgin dancing herself to death to appease the god of that very season.

Set in pagan Russia, The Rite was, for all intents and purposes, an uncontrolled experiment in music and dance. Musically, Stravinsky pushed the limits of meter, tonality, and dissonance, which must have caused quite some discomfort for an audience raised on formal music from the glory days of the Common Practice Period. Meanwhile, Nijinsky’s choreography blew the doors off of anything that had preceded it. Angular, violent, and downright convulsive, it was as much a powder keg as the score. So much so that Nijinsky’s choreography was scrapped from 1920 until its resurrection by the Joffrey Ballet in Los Angeles in 1987.

Despite its beginnings in obscurity (at best), or disaster (at worst), The Rite – particularly the score – has since emerged as an enormous commercial and artistic success, lending credibility to the Russian ballet scene, even being featured in Walt Disney’s color trick film, Fantasia. That being said…
Read up on the mayhem, witness the performances, and explore Stravinsky’s other (equally chaotic) works at Parsons Music Library, located on the second floor of Booker Hall. We hope you’ll be better behaved than the original audience.

photo credit