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Episode 21

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 21: The Last Podcast

So what do we do with the long trajectory of American history in relation to where we are now? How do we take centuries of classism, racism, sexism, and oppression and make something of it?…

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Episode 20

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 20: American Islamophobia—a History

The last European Crusade to the Near and Middle East took place in the fifteenth century, functionally culminating with the collapse of the Byzantine Empire and the fall of Constantinople in 1453. The legacy of the Crusades—military campaigns conducted by European nations under the banner of the Catholic Church which sought to “reclaim” the Holy Land for Christendom from 1095 until 1453…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

“Arrests by Offense, Age, and Race.” Accessed November 3, 2020. https://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/crime/ucr.asp?table_in=2.

Buncombe, Andrew. “Muslim Hate Crimes: Reports of Islamophobic Incidents in the US Soared Again in 2016.” The Independent, May 14, 2017. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/muslim-hate-crimes-increased-2016-islamophobia-donald-trump-latest-a7735141.html.

Burton, Jonathan. Traffic and Turning: Islam and English Drama, 1579-1624. University of Delaware Press, 2005.

Byers, Bryan D., and James A. Jones. “The Impact of the Terrorist Attacks of 9/11 on Anti-Islamic Hate Crime.” Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice 5, no. 1 (February 1, 2007): 43–56. https://doi.org/10.1300/J222v05n01_03.

“Civil Rights Report 2017: The Empowerment of Hate.” Civil Rights Report. Washington D.C.: Council on American-Islamic Relations, 2017. http://www.islamophobia.org/images/2017CivilRightsReport/2017-Empowerment-of-Fear-Final.pdf.

Encyclopedia Britannica. “Crusades | Definition, History, Map, Significance, & Legacy.” Accessed November 3, 2020. https://www.britannica.com/event/Crusades.

Editors, History com. “Reconquest of Spain.” HISTORY. Accessed November 3, 2020. https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/reconquest-of-spain.

Griffin, Eric J. English Renaissance Drama and the Specter of Spain: Ethnopoetics and Empire. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009.

Hafez, Farid. “Shifting Borders: Islamophobia as Common Ground for Building Pan-European Right-Wing Unity.” Patterns of Prejudice 48, no. 5 (December 2014): 479–99. https://doi.org/10.1080/0031322X.2014.965877.

Harris, Max. “Forbidden Passages: Muslims and Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America.” Catholic Historical Review 102, no. 4 (December 2016): 866–67. https://doi.org/10.1353/cat.2016.0243.

“Islam in America Post 9/11.” Accessed November 3, 2020. https://pluralism.org/islam-in-america-post-911.

Lees, Matt. “What Gamergate Should Have Taught Us about the ‘Alt-Right.’” The Guardian, December 1, 2016, sec. Technology. http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/dec/01/gamergate-alt-right-hate-trump.

Lock, Peter. Routledge Companion to the Crusades. London: Routledge, 2006.

Lyons, Jonathan. Islam Through Western Eyes: From the Crusades to the War on Terrorism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.

NW, 1615 L. St, Suite 800Washington, and DC 20036USA202-419-4300 | Main202-857-8562 | Fax202-419-4372 | Media Inquiries. “5 Facts about Crime in the U.S.” Pew Research Center (blog). Accessed November 3, 2020. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/10/17/facts-about-crime-in-the-u-s/.

NW, 1615 L. St, Suite 800 Washington, and DC 20036 USA202-419-4300 | Main202-419-4349 | Fax202-419-4372 | Media Inquiries. “Religion in Prisons – A 50-State Survey of Prison Chaplains.” Pew Research Center’s Religion & Public Life Project (blog), March 22, 2012. https://www.pewforum.org/2012/03/22/prison-chaplains-exec/.

Wilson, Tom. “Muslims and the Making of America.” Reviews in Religion & Theology 24, no. 3 (July 2017): 511–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/rirt.12995.

20 Comments

Episode 19

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 19: Just Say No

“Just Say No” was the touchstone of the 1980s social campaign run by First Lady Nancy Reagan and was broadcast as a public service campaign during afternoon and weekend television commercials involving big-haired singers and hip-hop dancers in shiny pants…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Evans, Alice, and Kris Bosworth. Building Effective Drug Education Programs. Bloomington, Ind.: Phi Delta Kappa International, 1998. http://www.pdkintl.org/edres/resbul19.htm.

Lopez, German. “The Federal Government Won’t Change Marijuana’s ‘Schedule.’ Here’s What That Means.” Vox, September 25, 2014. https://www.vox.com/2014/9/25/6842187/drug-schedule-list-marijuana.

Papillion, Natalie. “Reefer Madness: The Racist Origins of Marijuana Prohibition.” Medium, June 6, 2020. https://medium.com/equityorg/reefer-madness-the-racist-roots-of-marijuana-prohibition-37b9e7fb7d6c.

The Sentencing Project. “Report to the United Nations on Racial Disparities in the U.S. Criminal Justice System.” Accessed October 23, 2020. https://www.sentencingproject.org/publications/un-report-on-racial-disparities/.

CERD. “Study Adds to Doubts on DARE Program.” Accessed October 23, 2020. http://www.cerd.org/269-2/.

“United States – Punishment and Prejudice: Racial Disparities in the War on Drugs.” Accessed October 23, 2020. https://www.hrw.org/legacy/reports/2000/usa/Rcedrg00.htm.

“War on Drugs – Timeline in America, Definition & Facts – HISTORY.” Accessed October 23, 2020. https://www.history.com/topics/crime/the-war-on-drugs.

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Episode 18

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 18: Post-War Fatigue

Perhaps the most notable consequence of the Vietnam war has less to do with its political fallout on an international scale, and much more to do with the domestic social repercussions within the United States in terms of disillusionment with the American government and patriotism…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Norman, Sonya B., and Shira Maguen. “Moral Injury – PTSD: National Center for PTSD.” General Information. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treat/cooccurring/moral_injury.asp.

IMDB. “Platoon.”

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Episode 17

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 17: Prohibition and the Harlem Renaissance

Although we often think of the Civil Rights movement as primarily taking place post-World War II—and many of the major pieces of legislation, the March on Washington, and the activity surrounding the dismantling of Jim Crow, the Montgomery Bus Boycott…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Blum, Deborah. The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York. Reprint Edition. Penguin Books, 2011.

Foundation, Poetry. “An Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance.” Text/html. Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, October 15, 2020. Https://www.poetryfoundation.org/. https://www.poetryfoundation.org/collections/145704/an-introduction-to-the-harlem-renaissance.

———. “Langston Hughes.” Text/html. Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, October 15, 2020. Https://www.poetryfoundation.org/. https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/langston-hughes.

“Langston Hughes Biography – Life, Children, Parents, Name, Story, History, School, Mother, Book, Information, Born, College.” Accessed October 16, 2020. https://www.notablebiographies.com/Ho-Jo/Hughes-Langston.html.

Lilleslåtten, Mari. “Everyone loving their jazz was not enough, the Harlem Renaissance wanted to change the perception of black people,” April 20, 2020. https://partner.sciencenorway.no/history-music-politics/everyone-loving-their-jazz-was-not-enough-the-harlem-renaissance-wanted-to-change-the-perception-of-black-people/1673122.

Miller, Jason. “Langston Hughes’ Hidden Influence on MLK.” The Conversation, 2018. http://theconversation.com/langston-hughes-hidden-influence-on-mlk-91736.

Encyclopedia Britannica. “Prohibition | Definition, History, Eighteenth Amendment, & Repeal.” Accessed October 16, 2020. https://www.britannica.com/event/Prohibition-United-States-history-1920-1933.

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Episode 16

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 16: (Un)Civil Rights

In the last episode, I talked about the six criteria of a charismatic leader, specifically with relation to toxic charisma and Adolf Hitler. But charisma can be—and is usually thought of as—more positive, a leader who is popular, personable, and trying to improve the world…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Barnes, Brooks. “From Footnote to Fame in Civil Rights History (Published 2009).” The New York Times, November 25, 2009, sec. Books. https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/26/books/26colvin.html.

Hoose, Phillip. Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice. Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), 2009.

“Telegram from Martin Luther King, Jr. to Betty al-Shabazz.” Accessed October 7, 2020. https://web.archive.org/web/20160201130347/http://kingencyclopedia.stanford.edu/encyclopedia/documentsentry/telegram_from_martin_luther_king_jr_to_betty_al_shabazz/.

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Episode 15

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 15: The Second World War and the Rise of Hitler

Most Americans feel like they have a pretty good grasp of what World War II was about, not because we spend a particularly significant amount of time on it in history classes, but because our media—tv and Hollywood especially—has spent a lot of time on World War II…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Castillo, Daniel. “German Economy in the 1920s.” German Economy in the 1920s, 2003. http://marcuse.faculty.history.ucsb.edu/classes/33d/projects/1920s/Econ20s.htm.

Encyclopedia Britannica. “Nazi Party | Definition, Meaning, History, & Facts.” Accessed October 6, 2020. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Nazi-Party.

Pruitt, Sarah. “How the Treaty of Versailles and German Guilt Led to World War II.” History.com, June 3, 2019. https://www.history.com/player/262310467838.

Riggio, Ronald. “Charisma.” In Encyclopedia of Leadership. SAGE Reference, 2004.

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Episode 14

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 14: Plague and Pandemic

The Great War ended with a pandemic: the Spanish Influenza epidemic of 1918-1919. But it was not the first such global outbreak of a deadly disease… and, as we know all too well, it also would not be the last…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Aizenman, Nurith. “New Global Coronavirus Death Forecast Is Chilling — And Controversial.” NPR.org, September 4, 2020. https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/09/04/909783162/new-global-coronavirus-death-forecast-is-chilling-and-controversial.

Carmichael, Ann G. “Plague Persistence in Western Europe: A Hypothesis.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 157–91. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

Colet, Anna, Josep Xavier Muntané i Santiveri, Jordi Ruíz Ventura, Oriol Saula, M. Eulàlia Subirà de Galdàcano, and Clara Jáuregui. “The Black Death and Its Consequences for the Jewish Community in Tàrrega: Lessons from History and Archaeology.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 63–96. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. “COVID-19 Map.” Accessed September 27, 2020. https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html.

DeWitte, Sharon N. “The Anthropology of Plague: Insights from Bioarcheological Analyses of Epidemic Cemeteries.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 97–123. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

Gillespie, Claire. “This Is How Many People Die From the Flu Each Year, According to the CDC | Health.Com.” Health.com, September 24, 2020. https://www.health.com/condition/cold-flu-sinus/how-many-people-die-of-the-flu-every-year.

Green, Monica H. “Editor’s Introduction to Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 9–26. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

———. “Taking ‘Pandemic’ Seriously: Making the Black Death Global.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 27–61. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

Guarino, Ben. “We Were Wrong About Rats Spreading The Black Death Plague.” ScienceAlert, January 17, 2018, sec. HUMANS. https://www.sciencealert.com/black-death-plague-spread-humans-lice-not-rats.

Jarus, Owen. “20 of the Worst Epidemics and Pandemics in History.” LiveScience, March 20, 2020, sec. All About History. https://www.livescience.com/worst-epidemics-and-pandemics-in-history.html.

Varlik, Nükhet. “New Science and Old Sources: Why the Ottoman Experience of Plague Matters.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 193–227. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

Ziegler, Michelle. “The Black Death and the Future of the Plague.” In Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death, edited by Monica H. Green, 259–83. The Medieval Globe 1. Kalamazoo: ARC Medieval Press, 2015.

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Episode 13

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 13: The Great War

The Great War, so-called at the time because no one could believe that anyone would be so stupid as to engage in a massive international military conflict to the same degree ever again, completely changed the way people thought about and engaged in warfare…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Editors. “Russian Revolution — Britannica Academic,” 2019. https://academic-eb-com.newman.richmond.edu/levels/collegiate/article/Russian-Revolution/64488.

Ray, Michael. “Weapons of World War I.” In Encyclopedia Britannica. Accessed September 26, 2020. https://www.britannica.com/list/weapons-of-world-war-i.

Royde-Smith, John Graham. “World War I — Britannica Academic.” In Encyclopedia Britannica, 2020. https://academic-eb-com.newman.richmond.edu/levels/collegiate/article/World-War-I/110198.

 

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Episode 12

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 12: The Melting Pot

As you know from earlier discussions, the phrase “The Melting Pot” comes from a play of the same title written in 1908 by a Jewish man named Israel Zangwill. The idea of the United States as a place that collected people of many backgrounds and origins dates back earlier…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

“Early American Immigration Policies | USCIS,” July 30, 2020. https://www.uscis.gov/about-us/our-history/overview-of-ins-history/early-american-immigration-policies.

Editors, History.com. “Industrial Revolution.” HISTORY. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution/industrial-revolution.

Immigration History. “Foran Act of 1885 (Aka Alien Contract Labor Law).” Accessed September 19, 2020. https://immigrationhistory.org/item/foran-act-of-1885-aka-alien-contract-labor-law/.

“Immigration in the Early 1900s.” Accessed September 19, 2020. http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snpim1.htm.

Lewyn, Michael. “The Real Meaning Of The ‘American Dream.’” Planetizen – Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://www.planetizen.com/node/30899.

Nowrasteh, Alex. “Illegal Immigrants and Crime – Assessing the Evidence.” Cato Institute, March 4, 2019. https://www.cato.org/blog/illegal-immigrants-crime-assessing-evidence.

“Origins of the Federal Immigration Service | USCIS,” July 30, 2020. https://www.uscis.gov/about-us/our-history/overview-of-ins-history/origins-of-the-federal-immigration-service.

Staff, History com. “Chinese Exclusion Act.” HISTORY. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://www.history.com/topics/immigration/chinese-exclusion-act-1882.

VOA Student Union. “American-Borns Are Increasingly English-Only | Voice of America – English.” Accessed September 19, 2020. https://www.voanews.com/student-union/american-borns-are-increasingly-english-only.

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Episode 11

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 11: Imperialism, Orientalism, and Exceptionalism

Imperialism, as a concept, is defined as “a policy of extending a country’s power and influence through diplomacy or military force.” Like many other things, one’s perspective on imperialism depends entirely if one is a part of the imperial force or the people being colonized and absorbed into the empire…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

Kirka, Danica. “UK Museum Removes Shrunken Heads from Exhibit in an Effort to ‘decolonize’ Its Collections.” USA TODAY. Accessed September 18, 2020. https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/news/2020/09/15/uk-museum-removes-shrunken-heads-effort-decolonize-collections/5801771002/.

Said, Edward W. Orientalism. Reprint 1979. New York: Vintage, 1994.

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Podcast Episode 10

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 10: The Civil War

If we think back to 1776 and the conflict between the delegates from the north versus the delegates from the south over slavery—specifically, in the musical, between Adams and Routledge—it seems rather surprising that they didn’t recognize the conflict as the potential powder keg it actually was. On a political level…

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Podcast Episode 9

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 9: Before Columbus

If history books talk about the indigenous peoples of the Americas, they tend—like Zinn—to focus on the interactions between those peoples and European settlers. What happened…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

“Late Woodland A.D. 900–1600.” Accessed September 11, 2020. https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/first-people-the-early-indians-of-virginia/late-woodland-a-d-900-1600/.

“Modern Indians A.D. 1800–Present.” Accessed September 11, 2020. https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/first-people-the-early-indians-of-virginia/modern-indians-a-d-1800-present/.

Wagner, Daniel P., and Joseph M. McAvoy. “Pedoarchaeology of Cactus Hill, a Sandy Paleoindian Site in Southeastern Virginia, U.S.A.” Geoarchaeology 19, no. 4 (April 2004): 297–322. https://doi.org/10.1002/gea.10120.

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Podcast Episode 8

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 8: Sex, Gender, and Property

We tend to think that our modern understanding of gender as distinct from biological sex is new. It’s actually not, although the precise way in which we divorce biology from gender is distinct to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries…

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The following works were used in this podcast:

McMunn, Anne, Lauren Bird, Elizabeth Webb, and Amanda Sacker. “Gender Divisions of Paid and Unpaid Work in Contemporary UK Couples – Anne McMunn, Lauren Bird, Elizabeth Webb, Amanda Sacker, 2020.” Work, Employment and Society 34, no. 2 (2020): 155–73.

Rao, Aliya Hamid. “Women Breadwinners Still Do Most of the Family’s Chores.” The Atlantic, May 12, 2019. https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/05/breadwinning-wives-gender-inequality/589237/.

Zinn, Howard. A People’s History of the United States. Reprint (1980). New York: HarperPerennial, 2015.

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Podcast Episode 7

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 7: Storytelling and Story-Reading

As we think about the ways in which we disseminate our national myths, it is important to recognize that they come through more than just histories, good or bad. As I mentioned in the last podcast, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow…

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Podcast Episode 6

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast
Episode 6: Building a National Myth, Part I—Portraits of a Leader

Today’s podcast is going to cover a couple of very different things. First, we’re going to talk about how national myths begin. Then, we’re going to talk about the way in which visual art helps to reinforce and contribute to our ideas about ourselves and leadership…

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