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Author: Bezio

Podcast Episode 5

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 5: Revolution and Class

I’ve spent a lot of time—thus far—on this podcast talking about race and oppression. But oppression can be—and very often has been—inflicted on people for reasons other than race…

Visit Blackboard/Podcasts to listen.

Download here for 10.30 class.

Download here for 12.00 class.

The following works were used in this podcast:

National Association of Independent Schools. “Kimberlé Crenshaw: What Is Intersectionality? – YouTube.” YouTube, June 22, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViDtnfQ9FHc.

Smith, Cassander L. “‘Candy No Witch in Her Country’: What One Enslaved Woman’s Testimony During the Salem Witch Trials Can Tell Us About Early American Literature.” In Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies: A Critical Anthology, edited by Cassander L. Smith, Nicholas R. Jones, and Miles P. Grier, 1st ed. 2018 edition., 107–34. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

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Podcast Episode 4

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 4: “We are what we culture”

The word “culture” is one of those terms that everybody thinks they understand, but, when we get right down to it, is far more complicated and messy than we thought. For many people…

Visit Blackboard/Podcasts to listen.

Download here for 10.30 class.

Download here for 12.00 class.

The following works were used in this podcast:

Bezio, Kristin M.S. “Introduction to Leadership, Popular Culture and Social Change.” In Leadership, Popular Culture and Social Change, edited by Kristin M.S. Bezio and Kimberly Yost, 1–7. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2018.

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Podcast Episode 3

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 3: Cold Comfort

From the first moment that Europeans settled in what would become the United States, their relationship to people who did not look like them—whether indigenous Americans or imported African slaves—was one of domination and oppression…

Visit Blackboard/Podcasts for the whole episode…

Download here for the 10.30 class.

Download here for the 12.00 class.

The following works were used in this podcast:

Jones, Nicholas R. “Debt Collecting, Disappearance, Necromancy: A Response to John Beusterien.” In Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies: A Critical Anthology, edited by Cassander L. Smith, Nicholas R. Jones, and Miles P. Grier, 1st ed. 2018 edition., 211–21. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

Shook, Lauren. “‘[L]Ooking at Me My Body Across Distances’: Toni Morrison’s A Mercy and Seventeenth-Century European Religious Concepts of Race.” In Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies: A Critical Anthology, edited by Cassander L. Smith, Nicholas R. Jones, and Miles P. Grier, 1st ed. 2018 edition., 137–55. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

Zinn, Howard. A People’s History of the United States. Reprint (1980). New York: HarperPerennial, 2015.

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Podcast Episode 2

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 2: The Trouble with History and Truth

We talked last time about the fact that history is written by the victors, which is to say, by people. And if there’s one thing we know about people…

Visit Blackboard/Podcasts for the whole episode…

Download here for the 10.30 class.

Download here for the 12.00 class.

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Podcast Episode 1

Leadership and the Humanities Podcast

Episode 1: Leadership in History, Leadership and History

The subject and discipline of history is really the essence of the humanities. I don’t say this because I’m a historian—I’m actually not a historian…

Visit Blackboard/Podcasts for the whole episode…

Download here for the 10.30 class.

Download here for the 12.00 class.

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Podcast Blog

This area is where students should submit–as comments–questions and observations about the day’s podcast.

WordPress does not have enough storage for the podcasts to be uploaded here, but they are all available in Blackboard. Please make sure you comment on the correct episode post so that Dr. Bezio finds it.

Each podcast will appear on Blackboard and here following the class prior (so at about 12pm on Mondays and Wednesdays for the following class).

(Note: Students who may be hard of hearing should contact Dr. Bezio for transcripts.)

MONDAY
Sofia A.
Elina B.
Michael C.
Harrison C.
Olivia Co.
Mohammad K.
Sara M.
Maddie O.
Sophia P.
Mia S.
Tommy B.
Aine C.
Olivia Cr.
Alex D.
Henry G.
Pierce K.
Isa K.
Maggie O.
Michael S.
Katherine Y.

WEDNESDAY
Zander B.
Charley B.
Zariah C.
Carly C.
Morgan C.
Julia L.
Kayla O.
Sophie P.
Margot R.
Christopher W.
Zach A.
Julia B.
William C.
Delaney D.
Christina G.
Sam H.
Tess K.
Jack K.
Jeffrey S.
Annie W.

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Welcome to LDST 101

Leadership, like science, abhors a vacuum. Leadership is a phenomenon of society, a part of the interactive processes that defines the way we think of ourselves as members of political, religious, economic, social, educational, and interpersonal communities. We, as members of the human social group, are fascinated by our leaders – we worship some, deride others, and represent many in popular media. We spend countless dollars and hours examining leaders both historical and fictional, some of whom we laud as paragons and others we deride as villains. The traits we attribute to leadership vary widely based on circumstances, contexts, and historical eras, but are there universal characteristics to what defines leadership? Leaders require followers, but what causes some potential leaders to be successful? How do we – as both inside and outside observers – define success in leadership? What roles do we play as potential leaders and followers in making leadership successful?

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to some of the complexities that form the way we think about, study, and participate in leadership (and followership). We will examine political, philosophical, religious, literary, and popular texts and film in our attempt to define how the understanding of leadership has evolved. We will discuss the way in which we determine success or failure in leadership, but also the way in which that success or failure is influenced by ethical factors.

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