Remote Teaching @ UR

All classes at the University of Richmond have moved to remote teaching for the remainder of the Spring 2020 semester. Boatwright Memorial Library,
the Faculty Hub, Information Services (IS), and SPCS have created a number of resources to support faculty during this shift.

1 – Consider Your Learning Objectives

A variety of circumstances might require you to temporarily take your class online with minimal notice. Before you begin transitioning your course plans and materials, consider your learning objectives with these general principles in mind.

4 – Consult the Hub & Library

If you need help selecting or figuring out how to implement remote teaching strategies and tools, sign up for an individual consultation with Andrew Bell or Ryan Brazell, or email the Faculty Hub. For assistance determining what textbooks and other resources are available for your students, visit the Online Teaching: Textbooks and Resources LibGuide, or contact your liaison librarian.

2 – Select Your Strategies & Tools

As you develop a plan for moving your class to remote teaching, focus on what tasks you are trying to accomplish and pick the tool(s) that will help you achieve your goals. The Strategies and Tools page on the Continuity of Instruction website can help guide your thinking.

5 – Use Technical Guides

Once you’ve decided how you’ll adjust your teaching, browse the Learn Remotely Checklist from IS, which includes links to technical instructions, and browse or search the help guides available on SpiderTechNet. A Student Guide to Zoom is also available from LACOL.

3 – Consult Your Faculty Colleagues

One of the strengths of the UR community is the combined experience and expertise of our faculty. Trade ideas and get feedback from your teaching colleagues and Faculty Hub staff in our remote teaching discussion area, or browse our collected resources.

6 – Contact the Help Desk

If you are trying to complete a task and the technical guides didn’t answer your question, contact the Help Desk for assistance at x6400 or by email.

1 – Consider Your Learning Objectives

A variety of circumstances might require you to temporarily take your class online with minimal notice. Before you begin transitioning your course plans and materials, consider your learning objectives with these general principles in mind.

2 – Select Your Strategies & Tools

As you develop a plan for moving your class to remote teaching, focus on what tasks you are trying to accomplish and pick the tool(s) that will help you achieve your goals. The Strategies and Tools page on the Continuity of Instruction website can help guide your thinking.

3 – Consult Your Faculty Colleagues

One of the strengths of the UR community is the combined experience and expertise of our faculty. Trade ideas and get feedback from your teaching colleagues and Faculty Hub staff in our remote teaching discussion area, or browse our collected resources.

4 – Consult the Hub & Library

If you need help selecting or figuring out how to implement remote teaching strategies and tools, sign up for an individual consultation with Andrew Bell or Ryan Brazell, or email the Faculty Hub. For assistance determining what textbooks and other resources are available for your students, visit the Online Teaching: Textbooks and Resources LibGuide, or contact your liaison librarian.

5 – Use Technical Guides

Once you’ve decided how you’ll adjust your teaching, browse the Learn Remotely Checklist from IS, which includes links to technical instructions, and browse or search the help guides available on SpiderTechNet. A Student Guide to Zoom is also available from LACOL.

6 – Contact the Help Desk

If you are trying to complete a task and the technical guides didn’t answer your question, contact the Help Desk for assistance via SpiderTechNet, at x6400, or by email.

Additional Resources

Online Teaching Conversations

Recorded webinars hosted by John Zinn, SPCS. Login with UR NetID required:

Software Demonstrations

Recorded webinars hosted by IS and the Hub:

Technical FAQs for Faculty

Created by IS and the Hub:

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