Felony Convictions: The Disenfranchisement and Disempowerment of Black Communities

  For violators of criminal law, the process of stigmatization begins with arrest and conviction.[1] Arrest and conviction create “a panoply of economic, social, and political post-conviction penalties . . . intended to assure that the shame of incarceration is not forgotten or avoided.”[2] A felony conviction, in particular, carries collateral civil consequences that condemn Read more about Felony Convictions: The Disenfranchisement and Disempowerment of Black Communities[…]

For the Sake of Normalcy, Waive the Vaccine Patent Rights!

By Bushra Haque The patent law world has recently been challenged with whether patent rights should be waived for the COVID-19 vaccines. It has been almost two years since the COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives, and it often feels like life will never be normal again. At the end of last week, the world Read more about For the Sake of Normalcy, Waive the Vaccine Patent Rights![…]

Racial Profiling and Illegal Searches: How the Fourth Amendment Disproportionately Harms People of Color

The Fourth Amendment guarantees the people a right “to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.[1] For the most part, this appears to be a straightforward principle. But why is it also often the most controversial? As the American Civil Liberties Union notes, “this is one of our Read more about Racial Profiling and Illegal Searches: How the Fourth Amendment Disproportionately Harms People of Color[…]

Virginia’s Own Tiger King: How the Netflix Documentary Impacted Roadside Zoos

By Jessica Rooke Hey all you cool cats and kittens, remember Tiger King? This sensational Netflix documentary premiered in the height of the 2020 pandemic displaying Joseph Maldonado-Passage, the star known better as “Joe Exotic” and his concerning roadside zoo in Oklahoma. [1]    This documentary did not only just provide entertainment for us stuck at Read more about Virginia’s Own Tiger King: How the Netflix Documentary Impacted Roadside Zoos[…]

Raising Awareness for Virginia’s COVID Rent Relief Program

By Caleb Thompson Virginia’s Rent Relief Program (“RRP”) is a program administered via Virginia’s Department of Housing and Community Development, and it exists to help “support and ensure housing stability across the commonwealth during the coronavirus pandemic”.[1]The assistance the program provides comes primarily in the form of financial assistance for rent payments, with an opportunity Read more about Raising Awareness for Virginia’s COVID Rent Relief Program[…]

The Unconstitutionality of Ag-gag Laws

by Enzo Chiariello, Staff Editor In 2020, the Animal Legal Defense Fund (“ALDF”) released footage from the Dick Van Dam Dairy, a California dairy farm which supplies milk to corporations producing well known products such as the DairyPure and TruMoo brands.[1] The video contained images of “newborn calves . . . left to die or Read more about The Unconstitutionality of Ag-gag Laws[…]

Overbreadth in UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Battle

By: Gianna Fienberg, L’19 The University of California at Berkeley is considered to be a bastion of free speech.[1] Berkeley started the Free Speech Movement in 1964, when students held a sit-in to protest restrictions on free speech at the University that prevented students from distributing flyers about major political issues, such as the Civil Read more about Overbreadth in UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Battle[…]

FEMA: What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?

By: MaryAnn Grover, L’19 2017 has been described as a historically catastrophic year by the agency tasked with dealing with those catastrophes.[1] In 2017, almost eight percent of the United States population was affected by significant natural disasters, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) received more registrations for their Individual Assistance program than were Read more about FEMA: What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?[…]

Children’s Health Insurance Program Extended for Six Years

By Halley Taylor, L’19   The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), was created in 1997 to provide health insurance to children and, in some states, pregnant mothers in families with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid but too low to afford private insurance.[1] Today, CHIP provides approximately 8.4 million children and 370,000 expectant mothers Read more about Children’s Health Insurance Program Extended for Six Years[…]

Who Works When The Government Shuts Down?

By: Riley Henry, L’19 “Due to the temporary shutdown of the federal government that began at 12:01 a.m., January 20, all Library of Congress buildings are now closed and all public events are canceled until further notice.”[1] This declaration is the notice that greets visitors on the Library of Congress’s website.[2] Since the federal government Read more about Who Works When The Government Shuts Down?[…]

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