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Selected Events

Events of Interest Fall 2019

(The list of events below is not all-inclusive. There may be more that you find to attend; remember that if it is a non-campus or non-political event, you should double-check with Dr. Bezio whether or not it counts before you go.)

 

Streets, Spaces, Schools: What’s in a Name? (Tyler Haynes Commons, room 305)

Friday, September 6, 2019 from 12:30-1:25 p.m.

This program, part of the CCE Brown Bag Series, will center on the energy behind (re)namings and commemoration in Richmond and on campus. Free pizza provided.

 

First Fridays: PhotoVoice Exhibition (UR Downtown)

Friday, September 6, 2019 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Richmond’s most popular arts and culture program, RVA First Fridays, showcases nearly 40 venues in downtown Richmond. The University and greater Richmond communities are invited to begin each art walk during the academic year at UR Downtown for refreshments and entertainment. Join us for the opening PhotoVoice, an exhibition to bring awareness to and address the stigma of homelessness through individual stories and photographs.
Shuttles will run from Tyler Haynes Commons to UR Downtown at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. and return to campus at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Richmond on Broad Café will be open and serving dinner specials until 7:30 p.m.

 

Be Careful What You Wish For: Exploring the Consequence of Electoral College Reform (Weinstein Hall, Brown-Alley Room)

Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program,  part of the John Marshall International Center Lecture Series, features Joshua Kaplan, Associate Professional Specialist and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Political Science, University of Notre Dame.

Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration (Boatwright Library, Research & Collaborative Study Area, 1st Floor)
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 from 12:00 – 12:45 p.m.

This program, part of the Library’s Visible Scholars Series, features Dr. Javier Hidalgo, Associate Professor at the Jepson School of Leadership Studies. States restrict immigration on a massive scale. Governments fortify their borders with walls and fences, authorize border patrols, imprison migrants in detention centers, and deport large numbers of foreigners. Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration argues that immigration restrictions are systematically unjust and examines how individual actors should respond to this injustice. Javier Hidalgo maintains that individuals can rightfully resist immigration restrictions and often have strong moral reasons to subvert these laws. This book makes the case that unauthorized migrants can permissibly evade, deceive, and use defensive force against immigration agents, that smugglers can aid migrants in crossing borders, and that citizens should disobey laws that compel them to harm immigrants. Unjust Borders is a meditation on how individuals should act in the midst of pervasive injustice.

 

Global Environment Speaker Series – Alex Marten (Weinstein International, International Commons)

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program features Alex Marten, Economist at the US EPA National Center for Environmental Economics.

 

 

The Origins of the Internet (Jepson Alumni Center)

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

 This program, part of the Jepson Leadership Forum, features Katie Hafner, journalist, frequent contributor to The New York Times, and author.

 

Downtown Arts: Firehouse Theatre Presents WARM (UR Downtown/Libby S. Gottwald Playhouse)

Friday, September 20, 2019 rom 5:00-8:00 p.m.

UR Downtown hosts dinners in advance of selected downtown performances for University of Richmond students. A special guest introduces each evening’s program at dinner. Transportation is provided from campus, and performance tickets will be purchased for students in advance.
WARM is a new pop/rock opera by JC Gonzalez about three teenage runaways searching for home and finding it in each other on the streets of Los Angeles. Participants will take a 5:30 p.m. shuttle from campus to UR Downtown for dinner, then walk a block to the Dominion Energy Center for the performance. A shuttle will return participants to campus by 10 p.m. Registration is required.

 

Local Government Excursion: Richmond City Council (UR Downtown)

Monday, September 23, 2019 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Richmond is a vibrant center for city and state government and public policy. UR Downtown is located just a few blocks from the Virginia State Capitol and Richmond’s City Hall. The Richmond City Council and Richmond School Board meet regularly in City Hall at 301 North Ninth Street. The Virginia General Assembly convenes session every winter, beginning in January, in the Virginia State Capitol at 1000 Bank Street.
Each semester, UR Downtown and RVAGOV sponsors excursions to local government meetings. Free transportation, dinner, and educational context are provided as part of these excursions. Registration is required.

Participants will take the UR Downtown Shuttle, departing from the Tyler Haynes Commons Transportation Hub promptly at 5 p.m. Dinner will be provided by Richmond on Broad Café at UR Downtown (free for registered participants). After dinner, participants will take a short walk (two blocks) to City Hall for the meeting at 6 p.m. Shuttles will pick up at City Hall and return to campus by 8 p.m.

 

Radical Compassion: An Evening with Andrew Solomon (Modlin Center, Alice Jepson Theater)

Monday, September 23, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This year’s Weinstein-Rosenthal Forum on Faith, Ethics, & Global Society, features Andrew Solomon, Professor of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University Medical Center; writer and lecturer on politics, culture and psychology; winner of the National Book Award; and an activist in LGBT rights, mental health, and the arts.

 

If They Come For Us: An Afternoon with Fatimah Asghar (Weinstein Hall, Brown-Alley Room)

Tuesday, September 24, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program, part of the WILL/WGSS Speaker Series and UR Comes Out, features Fatimah Asghar, poet, screenwriter, educator, and performer. She is the writer and co-creator of Brown Girls, an Emmy-nominated web series that highlights friendships between women of color, and she is the writer of If They Come For Us, a collection of poems that explores being a young Pakistani Muslim woman in contemporary America. If They Come For Us was named one of the top ten books of 2018 by the New York Public Library, and it was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. She also is the co-editor of Halal If You Hear Me, an anthology that celebrates Muslim writers who are also women, queer, gender nonconforming and/or trans.

 

Advancing Trans Equality on Campus and Across the Country (Queally Center)
Tuesday, September 24, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program, part of the Sharp Viewpoint Series, features Sarah McBride, National Press Secretary for the Human Rights campaign, Delaware State Senate Candidate, and Author of Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality (2018). McBride will discuss what it means to be openly transgender in America today and the LGBTQ community’s ongoing struggle for equal rights. In 2012, McBride made national headlines when she came out as transgender while serving as student body president at American University. In 2016, she became the first openly transgender person to address a major party political convention when she spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. TICKETING will open on Tuesday, September 3, 2019 at 10:00 a.m.

 

20% for Pouring a Cup of Coffee? The Manipulative Art of Pre-Service Tip Requests (Boatright Library, Research & Collaborative Study Area, 1st Floor)

Wednesday, October 2, 2019  from 12:00 – 12:45 p.m.

This program, part of the Library’s Visible Scholars Series, features Dr. Sara Hanson, Assistant Professor of Marketing at Robins School of Business. Point-of-service apps such as Square and iPad technology are changing the etiquette of tipping. While the social norm to leave a tip at the end of a meal is common, what happens when we’re asked to leave a tip at the beginning of a service transaction (e.g., during payment but before receiving a coffee or sandwich)? Do customers see tip requests before service as manipulative? Do people tip more before or after service? Dr. Hanson will talk through some experimental studies and real tip data from a local Richmond business to provide insight into these questions.

 

Economics and Influence in Digital Spaces (Jepson Alumni Center)

Monday, October 7, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program, part of the Jepson Leadership Forum, features Derek Thompson, staff writer at The Atlantic, founder and host of the podcast, “Crazy/Genius,” and news analyst at National Public Radio.

 

Philosophy Speaker Series – Hillary Nye (Whitehurst Hall, Living Room)

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program features Hillary Nye, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law at University of Alberta. Her research is in legal philosophy, focusing particularly on issues of jurisprudential methodology, philosophical pragmatism, and the Rule of Law.

 

Arthur Ashe: Courage and Civility (Jepson Alumni Center)

Thursday, October 10, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program, part of the John Marshall International Center Lecture Series, features Raymond O. Arsenault, John Hope Franklin Professor of Southern History, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg.

 

Graduate Education Speaker Series – School Safety Reform (Weinstein International, International Commons)

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

This event should be a valuable addition to the regional conversation concerning school safety reform and the role of communities in protecting our schools, children, and staff.

 

 

RVAIDS: The AIDS Epidemic in Richmond (Tyler Haynes Commons, room 305)
Friday, October 18, 2019 from 12:30-1:30 p.m.

This program is part of the CCE Brown Bag Series. Free pizza provided.

 

Local Government Excursion: Richmond School Board (UR Downtown)
Monday, October 21, 2019 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Richmond is a vibrant center for city and state government and public policy. UR Downtown is located just a few blocks from the Virginia State Capitol and Richmond’s City Hall. The Richmond City Council and Richmond School Board meet regularly in City Hall at 301 North Ninth Street. The Virginia General Assembly convenes session every winter, beginning in January, in the Virginia State Capitol at 1000 Bank Street.
Each semester, UR Downtown and RVAGOV sponsors excursions to local government meetings. Free transportation, lunch or dinner, and educational context are provided as part of these excursions. Registration is required.

For Richmond City Council and Richmond School Board excursions, participants will take the UR Downtown Shuttle, departing from the Tyler Haynes Commons Transportation Hub promptly at 5 p.m. Dinner will be provided by Richmond on Broad Café at UR Downtown (free for registered participants). After dinner, participants will take a short walk (two blocks) to City Hall for the meeting at 6 p.m. Shuttles will pick up at City Hall and return to campus by 8 p.m.

 

Global Environment Speaker Series – Plant Feeling the Anthropocene (Gottwald Science, Auditorium)

Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program features Mary Kuhn, Assistant Professor of English and Program in Environmental Thought and Practice at UVA

 

Social Impacts & Health – this is a working title (Tyler Haynes Commons, room 305)

Thursday, October 24, 2019 from 12:00-1:00 p.m.

This program, an In Common Lunch, will feature Camilla Nonterah, Assistant Professor of Health Psychology, UR Department of Psychology. Nonterah’s research focuses primarily on physical and mental health in underserved groups and minority populations and is guided by a multicultural framework.

 

Philosophy Speaker Series – Stephen Engstrom (Westhampton Center, Living Room)

Thursday, October 24, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program features Stephen Engstrom, Professor of Philosophy at University of Pittsburg. His areas of interest include ethics, metaphysics, modern philosophy (especially Kant), and ancient philosophy.

 

 

Connecting Womxn of Color Conference (Location TBD)

Friday, October 25, 2019 from 1:00-5:00 p.m.

The Connecting Womxn of Color Conference fosters an open dialogue in which participants can think deeply and critically about current issues. This conference seeks to cultivate an outlet on campus focused on both intellectual and personal development in which women and gender-expansive individuals of color and their allies can have meaningful dialogues around issues important to them, inviting people from local universities and the greater Richmond community to share in and contribute to this diversity, equity, and inclusivity work. The conference intentionally focuses on networking in a welcoming environment in order to connect students with people that they otherwise might not have the opportunity to meet.

The term “womxn of color” is intended to transcend and embrace shades of color and to welcome and unite those of us who identify as women and gender expansive people of Arab/Middle-Eastern, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black/African American/Caribbean/West Indies, Hispanic/Latinx, and Native/Indigenous descent.*

 

Feminism Matters: How Women Activists Reshaped Virginia (Weinstein Hall, Brown-Alley Room

Monday, October 28, 2019 from 4:00 -5:00 p.m.

This program, co-sponsored by Boatwright Library, WGSS, and American Studies, features Dr. Megan Shockley, an alumna of the University of Richmond, a retired Professor of History at Clemson University and current Chair of the Friends of Boatwright Memorial Library. In the late twentieth century, women activists in Virginia worked at the grassroots and state level to further gender equality and fight for women’s rights in new ways.  Drawing upon interviews with feminists and archival resources, Dr. Megan Shockley will explain how women activists fought for the Equal Rights Amendment, protections for abortion, and changes to laws and systems addressing survivors of domestic and sexual violence.  While they may not have won all of the battles in which they engaged, they fundamentally reshaped the political and social terrain of the commonwealth.  Dr. Shockley is the author of Creating a Progressive Commonwealth: Women Activists, Feminism, and the Politics of Social Change in Virginia, 1970s-2000s.

 

Philosophy Speaker Series – Allan Hazlett (Whitehurst Hall, Living Room)
Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program features Allan Hazlett, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Graduate Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. His research interests include epistemology, moral psychology, metaethics, aesthetics.

 

Contempt in Congress: The Decline of Statesmanship in the U.S. Senate (Weinstein Hall, Brown-Alley Room)

Friday, November 8, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

This program, part of the John Marshall International Center Lecture Series, Sean Theriault, University Distinguished Teaching Professor of Government, The University of Texas at Austin.

 

 

The Race Card: Observations on Race, Identify, and Inclusion (Queally Center)
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program, part of the Sharp Viewpoint Series, features Michele Norris, Peabody Award-winning journalist, Founder of the Race Card Project, and Author of The Grace of Silence. Norris started The Race Card Project in 2010 after the publication of her family memoir, The Grace of Silence (2010), to foster a wider conversation about race in America. Norris will discuss how she turned a pejorative phrase into a productive dialogue on a difficult topic. Norris is one of the most trusted voices in American journalism. For more than a decade, she served as a host of NPR’s All Things Considered where she interviewed world leaders, American presidents, Nobel laureates, leading thinkers, and groundbreaking artists. TICKETING will open on Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 10:00 a.m.

 

The Internet as a Weapon (Jepson Alumni Center)

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program, part of the Jepson Leadership Forum, features Yasha Levine, Russian American investigative journalist and author.

 

An Evening with Chet’la Sebree (Weinstein International Center, International Commons)

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

This program, part of the WILL/WGSS Speaker Series and the Writers Series, features Chet’la Sebree, poet, editor, and educator. She is the author of Mistress, a book of poems that presents a cross-generational conversation between Sally Hemings and a contemporary narrator about what it means to be Black women in the respective landscapes. Mistress won the 2018 New Issues Poetry Prize. Chet’la holds an MFA in Creative Writing from American University. In fall 2019, she joins the Bucknell community as an Assistant Professor of English and the Director of the Stadler Center for Poetry and Literary Arts. She is a 2010 graduate of the WILL* program.

 

 

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