Quality of Life Gone?

In Dr. Heather Gardiner’s Talk, entitled Transplantation: Policy and Practice Considerations, the topic of BMI as a factor for patient eligibility to receive a kidney transplant was discussed. As of December 2017, there were 703,000 cases of End-State Renal Disease (ESRD). Amongst these cases, minorities are disproportionately affected, due to high rates of diabetes andContinue reading Quality of Life Gone?

BMI and Patient Eligibility for Kidney Transplantation Reflections

The talk focused on BMI and patient eligibility for kidney transplantation, with a focus on the policies and practices used in this field. As of December 2017, there were over 703,000 prevalent cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States. This is an extremely large population, and even more important to recognize isContinue reading BMI and Patient Eligibility for Kidney Transplantation Reflections

Dr. Gardiner Talk

During her lecture with the department, Dr. Heather Gardiner discussed BMI and Patient Eligibility for Kidney Transplantation, and a cited two studies she was a part of regarding provider attitudes towards the association between BMI and kidney transplantation. This talk directly related to many of our discussions on health disparities in the United States, asContinue reading Dr. Gardiner Talk

Dr. Gardiner Talk

Dr. Heather Gardiner gave the talk, “BMI and Patient Eligibility for Kidney Transplantation: Policy and Practice Considerations.” The presentation started by giving statistics of renal disease with the starting fact that 703,000 cases of end-stage renal disease in US. There are many cases in need of kidney transplants and even though rates of diabetes andContinue reading Dr. Gardiner Talk

Is being obese the determining factor?

On April 6th 2018, Dr. Heather Gardiner– associate professor at Temple University school of public health– spoke about BMI, obesity, and policy and practice considerations for eligibility for kidney transplantation. She began with presenting some stats: prevalence of end stage renal disease is 9.5 times greater in American Indians, and 3.7x greater in blacks whenContinue reading Is being obese the determining factor?