Overbreadth in UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Battle

By: Gianna Fienberg, L’19 The University of California at Berkeley is considered to be a bastion of free speech.[1] Berkeley started the Free Speech Movement in 1964, when students held a sit-in to protest restrictions on free speech at the University that prevented students from distributing flyers about major political issues, such as the Civil Read more about Overbreadth in UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Battle[…]

Consent: A Loophole in Human Trafficking Law

  By: Brittany Barnett, L’19   The United Nations defines human trafficking as having three elements: an act, a means, and a purpose:   “(i) an “action”, being recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons; (ii) a ‘means’ by which that action is achieved (threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, abduction, Read more about Consent: A Loophole in Human Trafficking Law[…]

FEMA: What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?

By: MaryAnn Grover, L’19 2017 has been described as a historically catastrophic year by the agency tasked with dealing with those catastrophes.[1] In 2017, almost eight percent of the United States population was affected by significant natural disasters, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) received more registrations for their Individual Assistance program than were Read more about FEMA: What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?[…]

Children’s Health Insurance Program Extended for Six Years

By Halley Taylor, L’19   The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), was created in 1997 to provide health insurance to children and, in some states, pregnant mothers in families with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid but too low to afford private insurance.[1] Today, CHIP provides approximately 8.4 million children and 370,000 expectant mothers Read more about Children’s Health Insurance Program Extended for Six Years[…]

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