New CD’s added this week!

Electronic Music

Karlheinz Stockhausen – Complete Early Percussion Works

Jazz

Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society – Brooklyn Babylon
Jon Irabagon – Foxy
Masters of Jazz – Vol. 1, Traditional Jazz Classics
Masters of Jazz – Vol. 4, Big Bands of the ’50s & ’60s
Masters of Jazz – Vol. 5, Female Vocal Classics
Outright! – Jon Irabagon’s Outright!
Les McCann – Talkin’ Verve!!!
Mostly Other People Do the Killing – Slippery Rock!
Cecile McLorin Salvant – WomanChild

Concert Artistic Music (i.e. “Classical”)

Ian Clarke – Deep Blue
Newspeak – Sweet Light Crude
Now Ensemble – Awake
Frank Martin – Le Vin Herbé
Missy Mazzoli – Cathedral City / Victoire

Opera

World Music

New CD’s added this week!

Classical

G.F. Handel – Triumph of Time & Truth
Philip Glass – Galileo Galilei
Philip Glass – Voices for Didgeridoo and Organ
Philip Glass – Dublin Guitar Quartet Performs Philip Glass
Joyce DiDonato – Stella Di Napoli
Lawrence Brownlee – Virtuoso Rossini Arias
Johann Adolf Hasse – Rokoko: Hasse Opera Arias
Christin Schillinger – Bassoon Surrounded
Christin Schillinger -Bassoon Transcended

World Music

Opika Pende – Africa at 78 RPM

Opera

Nico Muhly – Two Boys
Vivica Genaux & Simone Kermes – Rival Queens

Pop/Rock

Lonnie Holley – Just Before Music
Paul Simon – 1964/1993

New CD’s added this week!

Jazz

Cannonball Adderley – The Black Messiah
Bob Mintzer Big Band – Latin from Manhattan
David Esleck – Little Ears
Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra w/ Wynton Marsalis – Live in Swing City
Thelonious Monk – Big Band and Quartet in Concert
Thelonious Monk – Criss-Cross
Thelonious Monk – It’s Monk’s Time
Thelonious Monk – Live at the It Club
Thelonious Monk – Monk’s Blues
Thelonious Monk – San Francisco Holiday

Vocal Ensemble

Roomful of Teeth – Roomful of Teeth

Pop/Rock

The Band – Greatest Hits
Donald Fagen – The Nightfly
Jethro Tull – Benefit
Bruce Springsteen – Magic
Bruce Springsteen – The Promise
Bruce Springsteen – Tunnel of Love
Bruce Springsteen – Lucky Town
Yes – Close to the Edge
Yes – Fragile
Neil Young – Freedom
Neil Young – Harvest

Soundtracks

Jason Robert Brown – Bridges of Madison County
Steven Lutvak – A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Curtis Mayfield – Superfly

Western Concert Artistic (i.e. “Classical”)

Unsuk Chin – Xi

New CD’s added this week!

7/2/2014

Pop/Rock

The Band – Islands
Jethro Tull – Stand Up
Led Zeppelin – III
The Moody Blues – Every Good Boy Deserves Favour
Simon & Garfunkel – Old Friends
Sufjan Stevens – The Avalanche
Various – The Swing Time Records Story

Jazz

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra / W. Marsalis – Congo Square
Jimmy Smith – Compact Jazz – Jimmy Smith
Jimmy Smith – Compact Jazz – Jimmy Smith Plays the Blues
Wynton Marsalis Septet – Citi Movement (Griot New York)

How to Start Your Own Studio (For Free)

Editor’s Note: This guest post by one of our student managers, Matthew Gizzi, relates the fun he’s had experimenting and working with audio recording. He uses the Zoom H2, which is available for checkout at the Music Library, to record demos for later use in his studio projects. Read on to learn more about the ways to use the Zoom H2.

For the better part of a year, the music library has had a small collection of H2 Zoom recorders, which are available for purposes ranging from recording private lessons to large concerts to more studio oriented recording and demoing.  Personally I’ve used them and relied on them heavily to aid my songwriting process.  They are incredibly versatile and I’d definitely recommend taking them out for a little while just to experiment with.

Originally, adding them to the library collection was a move to bring the music library into modern times.  Before the H2, we had a collection of boom boxes and tape recorders that add some recording capacity, though the quality and practicality left much to be desired.  Now though, the recorders come in a carrying case that is less than half the size of the tape recorders and still carry enough tools to help out with most jobs you’ll encounter.

H2 in use for singer-songwriter with guitar

The H2 is handy for recording your singer-songwriter demos! The stand is included with accessories for the H2.

As a musician and songwriter, I’ve noticed a number of ways the recorders have helped me.  First, I’ve learned a lot more about the instruments I play and how it is they produce sound.  Using the H2 as a 3rd ear of sorts that I can place anywhere in the room, I’ve learned how my acoustic guitar, for example, sounds from different angles.  I’ve learned how to focus the microphone to get the fullest range from Booker’s pianos, and I’ve learned how to mike an amp to get the best tone for both clean and overdriven sounds.  Through experimenting with a recorder I can use for free, I’ve learned a lot that has certainly come in handy now that my studio has grown to include more professional equipment.

H2 buttons, dials

This is the Zoom H2, front display with buttons, and the inputs and other controls on the sides.

Also handy was the fact that I could really break into multi-instrument songwriting.  Once I had one track already recorded, I could easily play over that to come up with whatever harmonies, solos, extra instruments, or choruses I thought I liked.  As a result, my music began to become much more epic and larger in scope, something that I have certainly enjoyed playing around with.  The recorder comes with a built in metronome with count in, so you will have a good reference point to make sure all your tracks line up.

piano recording via Zoom H2

Need to recording acoustic piano in a practice room? Try the Zoom H2!
Rights to photo belong to kevinselby.com.

The last thing I’ll mention about the H2 is that is has a lot of flexibility.  It is great at recording acoustic guitar, but you can also widen the recording area to capture a full band rehearsal, or record a music lesson so you can always return to some good advice.  It is unlikely that you will check it out and find it cannot do what you want it to.  So I’d say: challenge yourself.  Check out the H2 recorder and record that demo for use in your portfolio, write a multi-track song or grab some friends and cover a great tune.  You have quite a few options when it comes to the music library’s Zoom.

What do you listen to during finals?

 

This thesis proposal has got me down. Help me, 50 Cent!

It’s almost here – the end of the fall semester! With finals almost over, and the campus starting to empty out a bit, I asked the student employees here at Parsons Music Library what they listened to in order to survive the end of the semester. The responses were great fun to read, and also very informative. We’re approaching a new era of music consumption (okay, we’ve actually been here for a long time already) — that of streaming audio and internet radio. It’s fun to hear the music anywhere you like, and get access in a way that suits you. And we’re not the only ones collecting data on this phenomenon, as you’ll see from this recent study.

Below you’ll find our student staff replies to the question “What do you listen to during finals?” Feel free to add your answers to this question in the comments area!

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