Justin Bieber: Trending Toward Heroism

Oops!  We had to remove the hero profile you’re looking for because it will soon appear in our new book Heroic Leadership: An Influence Taxonomy of 100 Exceptional Individuals, to be published by Routledge in 2013.

Our contract at Routledge required us to remove many of our profiles on our blog at this time.  But we do have other hero profiles and information about heroes on the menu bar located on the right side of this page.  Check it out!

In the mean time, please accept our apologies.  Here is more information about our new book.

You can click here to return to our HERO home page.  And thanks for visiting!

– Scott Allison and George Goethals

20 Responses to “Justin Bieber: Trending Toward Heroism”


  • Justin Who? I guess it is a sort of heroism for a teenager to stand-up in front of an arena full of people and lip-sync your songs. Or, to swim with the sharks in the Music Biz pool. But to me, the young man who caries out my bags at Martin’s Supermarket is far more of a hero. Parents dead and gone, raised by a problemed Grandma in poor health herself, sib lost to drugs and violence, another a child mom herself, a young man who managed with a little help from mentors and counselors and his own internal grit to get himself through High School, into a Tech School, who is staying clean and out of trouble, working, studying, praying, NOW this is a hero to me. But, I do enjoy your posts and hope you keep on keeping on your own sweet selves.
    Les S.

  • Scott – After attending a Bieber Concert with my daughter in November, I must disagree with any move to call Bieber a hero. While he is not a US Citizen, he does make the vast majority of his fortune on our soil and from our citizens. The concert, which took place in Hampton was preceeded by a sound check which we attended (because I paid not an insignificant sum to treat me baby, baby, baby). Bieber announced that he has just met with service members and families of those deployed. So wouldn’t you think he would show a tiny little bit of respect for our country? As his “sound check” continued his bandmate started playing our national anthem. Justin stopped him saying something like I don’t want to hear that, stop playing that, and other disparaging comments. And he kept singing Oh Canada. That’s fine to sing his national anthem. No one stopped him. But why would be pointedly put down ours?

    I was stunned. I mentioned it to the staff members who are hanging around – the on-site crew – and they said they were equally shocked. I demanded that he say something to his handlers. He did and their response was “oh, he’s just a kid” and he was “joking around”. Not anything about “gosh, maybe that wasn’t very respectful” or “thanks for pointing out that that was insensitive.” I will never buy one more thing for my child that is related to that kid – not that he cares as I am sure most will never know his true feelings. A hero? No way! A little bratty jerk? You bet.

  • Thank you Les and Alice for sharing your views. One of the consistent mantras of our book and our blog is the idea that heroism is in the eye of the beholder. There is no question that large throngs of young people idolize Bieber and view him as a hero. Does his talent and his behavior justify such status? It all depends on whom you ask.

    I’m glad that you are questioning Bieber’s inclusion in our blog. We’ve heard from many people that the label of hero is overused and that the power of the term “hero” is being diluted by its overuse. These blog profiles are a good place to engage in a constructive dialogue about what heroes truly are, and what behaviors we should expect from them.

    The national anthem incident you mention, Alice, tells me that like all 16 year-olds, Bieber has a lot of growing up to do. Let’s hope his family and friends help him along that path rather than shelter him or spoil him.

  • Congratulations! You have just torpedoed your credibility.

  • Again the website is about the concept of heroism not that Justin Beiber IS a hero.

    Though he has to be somewhat heroic to walk out in public with that haircut.

  • Honestly, he shouldn’t be considered a hero since he’s only 16. He still has a lot of ways to go. It’s still to early to say that he has overcome the pressure of drugs, alcohol, and criminal activities. Take for example Miley Cyrus, she was a role model to kids earlier in her career and look where she is now. She does racy photo shoots, is doing drugs, and partying. Probably later on his career when he gets accustomed to life in the spotlight, the corruptive influences, not saying that it would definitely happen, would slowly corrupt him. I don’t see any special qualities to him that would make him a hero over any other celebrity today. There are countless celebrities that could be considered heroes. They do the exact same thing as Beiber.

  • Truly, he has the trend to be a hero, but according to this, more people suit this place better here. As I’ve done a survey in the leadership class, Miley Cyrus, a teenager star as he is, ranked last as a leader. Although they are different, I still suspect their influence on people. In addition, being a star, he is looking for exposure. Maybe helping Haitian only serve for the exposure. Anyway, in my opinion, Justin Bieberis not qualified for the position here.

  • I have to admit, this is the first I’ve ever heard of Justin Bieber. While I’m a bit reluctant to name a teenage pop star as a hero, the fact is that millions of kids are more likely to use him as an example than Carl Sagan or Jane Goodall. The fact that he is keeping his nose clean (so far) may seem like faint praise (how bad are things when not doing something bad is the equivalent of doing something good?), but if he is genuinely involved in these charities he deserves a pat on the back at least. I wouldn’t call him a hero, but I’m happy he is providing a good example to his fans.

  • I disagree with Justin Bieber being called a hero. He is a star for teenagers to praise for his music but not a hero. Bieber has not completed a great task that will elevate him from being just another musician to hero. A hero, being a musician, would have to be someone who changes music with a purpose. His fans adore him but the title of a hero, he has not earned. Given time maybe he could earn the title of a hero, but right now in his career he is inexperienced to be called a hero.

  • Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton did not commit massive streams of felonies until their late teens and early twenties. Unlike Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton, Justin Bieber indeed has stayed off the tracks of negative media that usually arises when one reaches stardom. If Justin Bieber continues to maintain the course of the philanthropy, Justin Bieber may become a hero among men, rather than a hero among adolescent females. However, until Justin Bieber surpasses the age that most superstars falter in character, Justin Bieber cannot be characterized as a hero.

  • Justin Bieber is a hero in the eyes of many young people across the world. Is he a hero to me? Not really but a hero is in the eye of the beholder. Many people that consider him to be a hero may take into consider the drive and determination he put forth to turn his singing abilities into a career thus far. Yes he is young but he may be a little kid’s inspiration to sing thus making him a hero.

  • I strongly disagree with Justin Beiber being referred to as a hero in this sense. By many standards, most heroes in the music industry must either have a PROFOUND effect on the industry as a whole or rather do something heroic outside of the music industry. A charitable musician such as Bono of U2 would much more appropriate in that he utilizes his talent and fame in order to transform the world and those much less fortunate than him.

  • Justin Bieber may not be a hero to us because of what we think a hero his but to all young teenagers around the world. His music could be heroic to many people and maybe just not to me and my peers so i feel like i can not judge whether he is a hero or not but only state that i dont believe he is one

  • Great stuff from you, man. Ive read your stuff before and youre just too awesome. I love what youve got here, love what youre saying and the way you say it. Justin bieber is a hero. Belieber forever from aussie.

  • I like his songs.I remembered we played his youtube vevo playlist a couple of times in the house.It has such an upbeat music that will make you sing along with him. Though I’m not that much of a fan of Jusitn,I think he has talents.I hope he stays humble

  • I just love the way he sings. For me he is the most talented youngster in USA right now. HE IS THE BEST of all for now.
    seo

  • Many people that consider him to be a hero may take into consider the drive and determination he put forth to turn his singing abilities into a career thus far.If Justin Bieber continues to maintain the course of the philanthropy, Justin Bieber may become a hero among men, rather than a hero among adolescent females.

  • I am familiar with Justin Bieber. And it seems generous of him to donate and help other people through charity work. But I am not convinced that he should be heading to heroism and other stuff. I just hope that he’ll continue giving back all the blessings that he has been receiving. Thanks for the insights.

  • I have to admit, this is the first I’ve ever heard of Justin Bieber. While I’m a bit reluctant to name a teenage pop star as a hero, the fact is that millions of kids are more likely to use him as an example than Carl Sagan or Jane Goodall. The fact that he is keeping his nose clean (so far) may seem like faint praise (how bad are things when not doing something bad is the equivalent of doing something good?), but if he is genuinely involved in these charities he deserves a pat on the back at least. I wouldn’t call him a hero, but I’m happy he is providing a good example to his fans.

  • I’m so so glad that you are questioning Bieber’s inclusion in our blog. We’ve heard from many people that the label of hero is overused and that the power of the term “hero” is being diluted by its overuse. These blog profiles are a good place to engage in a constructive dialogue about what heroes truly are, and what behaviors we should expect from them.

Leave a Reply