Bill Cosby: The Hero Who Broke Racial Barriers

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13 Responses to “Bill Cosby: The Hero Who Broke Racial Barriers”


  • I love Bill Cosby! I remember watching Kids say the darnest things! when I was a child. And I know he does great work for children. And we all should applaud him for not caring about skin color but instead he appeals to everyone. I didn’t know his life story but I wouldn’t have imagined he came from humble background. I’m sharing an http://budurl.com/7jdf about another person who also overcome great adversities in his life.

  • dang amazing story man.

  • Great Post, Scott & George. Bill Cosby has been one of my heroes since his I Spy Days. His role in that show influenced my decision to enter the Army’s Counter Intelligence Corps (Reserve) when the opportunity arose. I rejected the recruitment effort the first time around (I’ll tell you that story one day), but changed my mind after becoming hooked on I Spy. Just like Cosby continues to preach, even back then, when I took personal responsibility for my life, my life changed and improved. I became a sergeant within my first year and in a couple of years was First Sgt. of my CIC Unit. What I know about Cosby is that he walks his talk, and keeps on talkin’ while he’s walkin. One other little bit…during the run of the Cosby Show, the set (the family home) always featured an ever-changing display of great African American and African Art. Great Post!

  • I love Bill Cosby. :D His comedy routines are hilarious, he was great (along with Robert Culp) on I Spy and he is a man of great integrity. His efforts to inspire young Blacks to better themselves was a breath of fresh air in an era of self-segregation and cultural fragmentation (it’s mind boggling that he was criticized for fighting racial disparity). I hope he lives forever. :)

  • I really liked this article it sets a good example and considers the readership, everyone is included in this article and yet he says the key to failure is trying to please everyone. Much love going out to Bill I often thought of you when I stood there watching my Dad get fitted for suits. If I remember correctly Bill always came to Canada to maintain his fashion, this was rare, seldom if ever do I remember in my childhood any celebrity coming to Canada on a regular basis.

  • Bill Cosby’s journey from dropping out of high school to eventually becoming a star is heroic in itself. His use of his talent to bring people together and break racial barriers is incredible. Accomplishing so much when initially given so little is truly heroic in my opinion.

  • What I really like about the Cosby Show was the calmness and patient of Dr. Cliff Huxtable character. It was one of the few shows my parents and I could watch continues reruns – although my parents were hugely against watching television as they believed it would vegg out my brain.
    I think I will be a fan for life of Dr. Bill Cosby work, but unfortunately his sad deterioration of fame is a result of his age. With his age a sense of thinking- like many older people he has fallen victim to his own standard of the past. No matter his ways or inability to adjust to the modern time – I still will consider him a hero, educator and roll model.

    H.T.

  • Bill Cosbys use of comedy and the media to breakdown racial barriers is truly heroic. I think the media is a central tool for the manipulation of societal norms and Cosby was incredibly intelligent to use it to encourage better perceptions of African Americans. I also respect his messages of self empowerment.

  • I remember, when I was in the fourth grade, that we had to choose someone famous, write a book report about the person, and, make a puppet of the person to accompany the presentations of our reports. I chose to do my report on Bill Cosby.

    I actually remember using a lot of the same information found in this Blog for my report – in particular, his difficult childhood, his ability to triumph and overcome a variety of obstacles, and, his vast amount of success that he was eventually able to acquire. I distinctly remember being impressed by all of his accomplishments, considering his past, and I was only in the fourth grade.

    I especially agree with the first sentence that "€¦people love heroes who come from humble origins." I think this is especially so because if a hero is down-to-earth, it puts him or her on the level of the "common" man, becoming a lot more personal and real. Cosby's ability to reach out to the American people on a level relatable to all, while, at the same time, touching on controversial issues plaguing American society, as a whole , paints the picture of a true hero to me.

  • Bill Cosby is undeniably a hero. He changed the racial barriers within the TV industry. He used his talent and circumstance to portray the ideal father figure as well as encouraged viewers to look outside of the paradigm of a African American male’s role within a family.

  • i love this man, and all he had overcame. i always imagined my family being like his on his show. Him growing up in Philly which was a hard time, and continue to do what he loved even though he wasn’t the best student is very encouraging to many people

  • Bill Crosby is the man. Its hard not to consider this man a hero. From the slums to being one of the most know people in the US. Bill Crosby will always be my hero hes the man.

  • I really like the last sentence of this post “Cosby achieved success because he risked failure.” I think that in itself is heroic. “The key to failure is trying to please everybody.” His from not completing high school to eventually becoming a star is heroic in itself. I really enjoy how he used his talent of being a comedian to not focus on vulgarity and violence to attract viewers.

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